Pigtail Aluminum Wraparound Bridge

Pigtail Aluminum Wraparound Bridge, Chrome
Chrome Item # 4507 Due 1+ month
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$121.21
Pigtail Aluminum Wraparound Bridge, Nickel
Nickel Item # 4507-N In stock, ready to ship!
$121.21
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Pigtail Aluminum Wraparound Bridge

Made of lightweight aluminum for tone, with a slightly lower profile to help solve high string action problems.

This adjustable bridge/tailpiece adds intonation adjustment to the Les Paul® Junior and similar guitars, and it's a great alternative for custom instruments, too.

String
spread
 
Saddle
radius
 
Post
spacing
2-1/16"
 
12"
 
3-1/4"

The strings install at the front, two allen screws adjust the overall bridge angle, and the unnotched metal saddles have individual intonation screws. Mounting posts are not included, TonePros Locking Studs are required for optimum setup.
About bridge & tailpiece measurements
Bridge and Tailpiece Measurements Snippet

String spread is the distance between the centers of the outer strings on a bridge or tailpiece.

Saddle radius determines the arc formed by all the individual saddle heights, and is similar to the measurement of a fretboard.

Stud/post spacing is the distance between the centers of the mounting posts of a bridge or 'stop' tailpiece.

Positioning the bridge
Find bridge placement for any scale with our free online tool fret position calculator.

Tip: Slotting Tune-o-matic style saddles
Nut slotting files work great for metal saddles. Choose your file size as you would when slotting a nut: use the same gauge as the string, or a few thousandths larger. After filing to the desired depth, we suggest polishing the slot with Mitchell's Abrasive Cord to remove file marks and burrs.

    • Item #
    • Weight
    • 4507
    • 0.0900 lbs. (0.04 kg)
    • 4507-N
    • 0.0912 lbs. (0.04 kg)
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