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5th String Capo Spikes, Package of 15

5th String Capo Spikes, Package of 15

5th String Capo Spikes, Package of 15

Item # 5307
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5th String Capo Spikes, Package of 15

About This Item

The "original" 5th string capos! These model railroad spikes have become a simple and popular way to capo the 5th string on your banjo.

For players who prefer not to retune the string or who don't want to attach a sliding capo onto the side of the neck. A spike can also be installed behind the 5th fret to serve in place of a 5th string nut.

Install a capo spike low enough to prevent string buzz over the fret, while letting you slip the string in and out for quick key changes. Hammering a spike into the fingerboard can bend the spike or split the wood. Our tapered router bit is recommended for installation.


CALIFORNIA PROPOSITION 65 WARNING
WARNING: Cancer and Reproductive Harm - www.P65Warnings.ca.gov.


Trade Secrets!

Trade Secrets!

Setting up a banjo's 5th string: nut, capos and peg

Todd Sams shows how he sets up a banjo 5th string using railroad spikes, a block of wood, and a camless clamp.

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4.5
  • 4.69 average rating from 29 reviews
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5.0

Everything I need and more!

By

Verified Buyer


Your service was right on time and met all my expectations.

5.0

5th string capo spikes

By

Verified Buyer


used only one. I had to make a I/32 drill bit for the job. I am very particular and the job appears to be perfect. thanks StewMack. Ron Parker

5.0

5th String Capo Spikes

By

Verified Buyer


I've used these little guys for a long time. Easier to get your thumb around the neck to make a clear note on the fifth string up the neck. One little tip: put them in close behind the fret, not in the middle of the fingerboard. They stay put better. And don't tap 'em in too far!

-Herb Pedersen

4.0

As advertised

By

Verified Buyer


I wish I had filled them down a bit. The range between wire fitting under it and buzzing over it is small..

4.0

Simple solution

By

Verified Buyer


For an easy to install and relatively simple solution for how to capo your banjo's 5th string, just place a couple of these little jewels at the 7th and 9th frets, and you've suddenly got the ability to play in different keys with standard banjo tunings. Requires micro drill bits (use a Dremel tool) and a small pair of needle-nosed pliers and a light, modelers hammer.

3.0

not quite

By

Verified Buyer


HO RR spikes evidently come in differing gauges. IMO these are too thin. While they worked, the very thin L-tang seems too fragile for adequate dressing; very important to decrease catching your thumb when you fret the 5th string. . Makes me nervous that it's going to break/fail. Check YT to see others install AND DRESS spikes. Theirs usually are the slightly thicker gauge, IMO. Kudos to Stewmac for offering them though; maybe they can offer the thicker ones too.

5.0

spikes

By

Verified Buyer


I like these do to the fact they are easy to install, and fairly smooth inside and out. I make a small hole, measure the depth and then cut the end of the spike off, I then place spike in the hole and tap down to 10 thousand clearance. Run some 1500 grit paper on top and under spike then place string in and play it hard a couple of times to make sure the spike is in deep enough to hold the 5th string from popping out.

5.0

Banjo Spikes

By

Verified Buyer


Just what I needed!

5.0

Banjo Guy needs Railroad Spike Capo on Short String

By

Verified Buyer


It was amusing to meet Andrew, a young college student with a super nice banjo and a problem. He tried to explain it, so I said, I know a banjo guy in Ohio so we logged on to STEWMAC. Sure enough there were the miniature railroad spikes used to capo the small upper string of the banjo. I'm a guitar guy. but we ordered these and Andrew brought his banjo and we got the additional locations installed so he can play in all the keys he needs. We nipped them off a tiny bit, about 1/8th inch, to make them easier to install, mainly into the fretboard and not the neck itself. We chucked up a .054 shortened guitar string, down to the inner core. Still had to add some masking tap to the winding on the guitar string drill bit to make it grip in the chuck. Drilled tiny hole using only inner core of the string. They went in nicely, used automotive feeler guages to get it just right and then sanded lightly. Then using a pipette we super glued each capo spike in place wicking away excess super glue with edge of a paper towel. Job turned out nice. Thanks Stew Mac, right stuff- in the bag.

5.0

Jt

By

Verified Buyer


Excellent

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