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StewMac HeatStick for Neck Removal

StewMac HeatStick for Neck Removal

StewMac HeatStick for Neck Removal For Solomon SL-30

For Solomon SL-30

Item # 0553
In stock, ready to ship!

$64.95

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StewMac HeatStick for Neck Removal For Solomon SR-965

For Solomon SR-965

Item # 0562
In stock, ready to ship!

$64.95

+
StewMac HeatStick for Neck Removal For Weller WES51

For Weller WES51

Item # 0556
In stock, ready to ship!

$64.95

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StewMac HeatStick for Neck Removal

About This Item

Remove glued necks with no damaging steam
The HeatStick™ uses the heat of your soldering iron to soften the glue in a guitar's neck joint for removing the neck.

The HeatStick replaces the old method of injecting steam into the joint, so delicate finishes are spared the damaging effects of hot steam. Use the HeatStick with our Neck Removal Jig or any other neck-removal system.

Thanks to repairman Ian Davlin for inventing this dry heat concept, and to repairman Gene Imbody for adapting it for soldering irons.

Neck joint trouble creates high action
Years of string tension take their toll on a guitar. The pressure distorts the body near the neck joint, changing the neck angle. String action becomes too high to play.

Lowering the bridge saddle compensates for this up to a point, but if the saddle can't be lowered any farther it's necessary to remove the neck and reglue it at a corrected angle (a "neck reset").

Don't add to the problem! The traditional way to release a glued neck joint is by piping steam from boiling water into the joint. That much water damages delicate finishes, and can loosen braces and neck blocks. That's why we've developed the HeatStick. The HeatStick works well with our Neck Removal Jig.

    Specifications
  • Heat tempered copper
  • Diameter: .125" (3.18mm)
  • Available to fit Solomon or Weller soldering irons
  • Includes 2 bits for drilling pilot and access holes

The HeatStick is for acoustic guitar necks with heels that are over 2" tall, you can also modify it to work for shorter neck joints like electric or archtop necks.

Depending on the type of glue and fit of the neck joint, we found that setting the soldering station on its highest setting yielded the best and fastest results.

Dimensions: Mounting connection for Solomon and Weller


CALIFORNIA PROPOSITION 65 WARNING
WARNING: Cancer and Reproductive Harm - www.P65Warnings.ca.gov.


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4.5
  • 4.38 average rating from 29 reviews
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5.0

First time user.

By

Verified Buyer


The HeatStick worked as illustrated in the video. It took a little longer to heat up than I had anticipated but it did the job. I also purchased the Solomon SR-965 soldering iron for this application so now I have a new iron, which I needed. Good stuff !

4.0

Great help with removing a damaged glued neck!

By

Verified Buyer


I was able to get the glued neck off of a LS replica with much more ease than steaming. It also was less impact on the body, no danger of steam damage to the finish. By using the heat to loosen the glue, it really made the removal quicker and less stressful.

5.0

Outstanding!!

By

Verified Buyer


I may run into a special circumstance where I'll need the steam pot again but, since I bought the Heatstick, it's become my GOTO.

Allowed me to remove the neck on this Mossman Golden Era, with no damage to the intricate vine inlay.

5.0

Old dog learns new trick

By

Verified Buyer


I initially resisted getting one of these because I thought it was a solution looking for a problem. I've used steam to remove necks for years and have never had a problem. Any blushing caused by the steam wiped off with Behkol and a quick buff. This tool looked like a slow way to do things, and time is money in a pro repair shop. And the larger fretboard hole... no thanks.

Recently I met Ian Davlin, one of the developers of this tool, and heard him speak favorably about using dry heat. With two vintage neck resets to do in the shop this week, I decided to give the heat stick a try. I already own a Solomon SL-30 soldering station.

I have to say, after giving the heat stick a test drive on an old Harmony Sovereign, I'm sold. Yes it took longer than steam, and the insert hole is larger than that needed for a steam needle, but I love the slower pace and the control, not to mention how nice and clean everything is without the hot wet steam all over. The extra time (it took 30 minutes to get the neck off this one, the glue seemed to be a mix of thick hide glue and crusty white glue) will mostly be made up for by not having any finish to work on. I'll chalk up a well-made and color matched plug for the hole to be part of the process.

The Sovereign neck was not easy to get off. I can see this tool working really well and taking less time on Martins. Glad I decided to get it.

5.0

Great tool!

By

Verified Buyer


I had a satin finish Gibson that I really didn't want to steam for fear of finish blushing etc, and this did the trick! I can now set the neck with no need to following up with finish work.

1.0

Great Idea but terrible for the expensive soldering pens

By

Verified Buyer


I was really excited to try this tool out and think that it's a brilliant idea, but using it with expensive plastic handled soldering pens is flawed. When the stick is upright in the joint, heat travel directly up to the plastic handle. As the stick will bind a bit from the softened glue, the soldering pen will pull apart. At $50 plus shipping for a new Weller pen, I'm afraid to try it again. Not sure if the same applies to the Solomon pens, but my Weller pulled apart in the middle of my first use.

5.0

Simply a better tool

By

Verified Buyer


Bought this to use on a pristine guitar needing a neck re-set, beats the old steam out method hands down! MORE patience is required, as is the Solomon SL-30 soldering station, and the access hole is bigger, but its easily repaired. Small trade off for no finish problems in my book.
Kudos Stew Mac!!

5.0

SNAAAAP!

By

Verified Buyer


It worked! No more blushing of surrounding finish. I didn't have the problem others have described concerning melting of handle or stick. Hopefully it won't be a problem in the future I chose the Solomon version and used what was maybe a lower temp (450 deg???) for a longer period of time which 'may' have helped - or not I don't know. Anyway, definitely the easiest, cleanest, cuss-free neck removal I've done!

4.0

Better than steam

By

Verified Buyer


First use was on a 1938 H-G0 and the heat stick easily paid for itself on that one guitar. 12 fret guitar with a full width heel is not an easy removal and almost always results in some finish damage with steam. This was quick and easy and not a trace of finish damage. I wish they made this for the Hako irons which is what I use for daily soldering but even with the cost of the Solomon iron included the heat stick/Solomon combo is worth the $.

3.0

It works, but be careful!!

By

Verified Buyer


I've only done two guitars so far. The first neck came off ok, but the soldering pen melted and was ruined. The second one I gave up after a half-hour, and after noticing that the pen was beginning to melt as well. I have a Weber soldering station, and it seems that the pens just aren't intended to hold up under constant maximum heat for that long. The second guitar was a Takamine, with a wide heel, which I'm sure takes a lot more heat to free.

Be very careful pulling the pen out... Use a plier and pull it out by the metal part, not the handle.

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