ColorTone Metallic Aerosol Guitar Lacquer

ColorTone Metallic Aerosol Guitar Lacquer

ColorTone Metallic Aerosol Guitar Lacquer Antique Gold

Antique Gold

Item # 3890
In stock, ready to ship!

$23.26

3 or more $20.93
+
ColorTone Metallic Aerosol Guitar Lacquer Pale Gold

Pale Gold

Item # 3891
In stock, ready to ship!

$23.26

3 or more $20.93
+
ColorTone Metallic Aerosol Guitar Lacquer Bright Gold

Bright Gold

Item # 3892
In stock, ready to ship!

$23.26

3 or more $20.93
+
ColorTone Metallic Aerosol Guitar Lacquer Silver

Silver

Item # 3893
In stock, ready to ship!

$23.26

3 or more $20.93
+
 
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ColorTone Metallic Aerosol Guitar Lacquer

About This Item

Create your own goldtop, or silver guitar. ColorTone Metallic Aerosols are not hardware store colors: we've formulated these to match well-known guitar finishes.

3 shades of gold
Ever notice the way goldtops vary in color, depending on age and condition? Each is beautiful but different, so we offer three shades of gold:
Antique Gold This is the classic goldtop most people have in mind.
Pale Gold Lighter, slightly faded look of years in a pawn shop window.
Bright Gold Brilliant sparkle, like it just came from the factory.

Silver recreates the look of Fender's Inca Silver finish.

Use ColorTone Metallics as a base coat under transparent colors for classic finishes like Candy Apple Red or Sparkling Burgundy.

"I see a lot of vintage guitars in my shop. Most aerosols don't really come close to looking like the colors they are intended to. These ColorTone finishes nail the look of vintage beauties I've had on my bench."
—Erick Coleman
, guitar repairman and StewMac tech advisor

ColorTone® Metallic Aerosols are the easiest way to spray a metallic finish. No metal powders to mix, and no clogged spray guns. Spray them over ColorTone White Vinyl Sealer. They can also be sprayed over smooth unfinished wood or grain filler. Spray additional coats of ColorTone Clear Aerosol Guitar Lacquer for a hard, durable finish with a deep gloss. Metallic coats should not be sanded.

13-ounce aerosol cans.


Tips for aerosol finishing
A guitar body typically requires 1 can of sealer, 1 can of color, and 4-6 cans of clear topcoat.

  • Use warm lacquer, not cold. Professionals spray warm lacquer to reduce spatters which require sanding. Warm your aerosol cans in a sink of warm tap water.
  • Spray multiple thin coats instead of one heavy coat.
  • Use sanding sealer to seal the wood and build up the finish before applying your color coats or clear topcoats. Sanding sealer is heavy-bodied; one coat equals two coats of lacquer. One or two cans of sealer is usually enough for an entire guitar. After building up the sealer coats, level sand with 320-grit paper to create a thin, flat surface for your color or clear coats.
  • Compared to professional spray guns, aerosols create a slightly rougher surface, so topcoats require more sanding of the clear topcoats to achieve a level surface.
  • Metallic coats should not be sanded. Spray clear coats over metallics to build a topcoat which can be sanded for a final, level surface.
  • Choose low humidity days for spraying. Dan Erlewine often recommends spraying outdoors on a clear dry day.

Our ColorTone Aerosol Finishing Kit is great for the first-time finisher. It includes sealer, gloss lacquer, polishing compounds and our Guitar Finishing Step-by-Step book.



CALIFORNIA PROPOSITION 65 WARNING
WARNING: Cancer and Reproductive Harm - www.P65Warnings.ca.gov.


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4.0
  • 4.22 average rating from 9 reviews
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5.0

Love this product!

By

Verified Buyer


I believe I purchased 10 or 15 cans of this color. Are use it as an accent color or background color provides a really bright clear shiny base. Easy to use. Just make sure you shake well and warm the can. Here is latest project with silver.

3.0

Nice stuff, but not for the faint of heart

By

Verified Buyer


I decided to refinish an old Fender Swinger after I did some bridge modifications. I used to paint stuff as a hobbyist in my younger days, and usually get nice results with rattle cans, so I decided to give it a go. I used the StewMac White Vinyl Sealer as a primer after I stripped the guitar body with acetone.

I painted during mid-summer in southern Arizona, so even though StewMac recommends low humidity for optimum results with their lacquer, I think the relative humidity was actually too low in my case. I painted six coats of silver, applying as directed (very light coats, with recommended drying intervals). Metallics are more difficult than solid colors, as you can't sand between coats. I was having a hard time getting a nice, even coverage--I believe the low humidity contributed to the difficulty, as it seemed the paint was drying almost as soon as it hit the guitar body. I tried painting very early in the morning 33% relative humidity, as opposed to the afternoon (sometimes as low as 10%), always out of direct sun, but I just could get a nice, even coat. The can I received had the "round" spray pattern nozzles, not the "flat" fan type, so that may have contributed to my difficulties. I suppose I could have requested StewMac send me the other nozzles, but I figured they would ship what works best on their spray paint.

Anyway, long story longer, I finally gave up trying to get the most even and awesome coats of color on, and just settled for least worst (which looked OK, but not awesome). I got good (not excellent) results, for fraction of the cost of a professional refinish job, and I think my hair is a lot thinner and grayer than when I started the project.

I think this stuff is excellent for a fairly skilled person with spray painting experience. It wasn't very fun for me, as I stressed out about it way more than I thought I would, and for a short while, almost stripped it again after the first few coats of silver. I just couldn't get a nice, smooth, even coat to lay down (again, I think the warm temps and low humidity was factor, but there wasn't a recommended humidity mentioned anywhere in the instructions, and I always painted below the maximum recommended temp written in the instructions.

I finished the project by spraying 4 coats of gloss clear lacquer, then let it cure for a couple weeks. I level sanded the clear, then polished the guitar body with an electric buffer, and at that point I felt fairly satisfied with the results; lacquer is a forgiving surface when it comes to sanding out any orange peel, and getting a beautiful glossy shine.

Will I ever do this again? Probably, but only because I'm a glutton for punishment. : )

5.0

Grateful to have this product

By


If you think working with this gold lacquer paint is difficult (and it can be, no doubt) try sourcing the component materials and mixing some up yourself. There was (or maybe still is) an online supplier of odd vintage guitar color lacquer paints who for quite some time supplied a good vintage Gibson -50's gold lacquer paint.I think that outfit may be slowing down or even winding up after many years and I for one am very glad to have a high quality alternative product from a proven high quality supplier . Ive used all the color tone products from Stew Mac Including these aerosols and they are first rate.

3.0

Most difficult paint job I've ever done.

By

Verified Buyer


This Antique Gold is very difficult paint to work with, must be put down very dry or flake moves in unwanted ways, and then if using Behlin Instrument lac clear, you must put down very dry as well, or the flake just flattens out, even after 4-5 coats. The front and sides look like they might be ok, but have to redo the back again (just ordered my 3rd can of Gold, and bought more Behlin clear. I now have 9 coats of Behlin clear. We'll see how it looks when I level it out. StewMac has been very helpful in resolving the situation. Thanks guys.

5.0

Pricey and well worth it

By

Verified Buyer


I bought this not to paint an instrument but to fill in some lettering I had incised into a piece of walnut. As I say, it's pricey compared to metallic paints you find at your home improvement store, but that's because it contains so much more in the way of solids than the h.i. paints. Sprays well, though a spray nozzle like one finds on cans of Deft lacquer would be better in my opinion. Seems even to have a greater tolerance for moisture in the air than most lacquers. I would definitely use it again. Oh, it really does look like gold!

5.0

Great

By

Verified Buyer


Definitely worth the money to get a great finish the right way

5.0

If your refinishing a gold top, this paint is the best on the market!

By

Verified Buyer


After several attempts from another paint supplier, and receiving "copper" paint. We ordered your antique gold. Not only was it the correct color, it has the correct grind. Looks great!

4.0

gold aerosol

By

Verified Buyer


i'm not a really experienced guitar painter i've painted a few but i thought gold might look cool. I followed the DVD wood filler, shellac, sanding sealer, let dry then the gold. it's a litttle tricky realize it's got color and metallic coming out at the same time! you have to shake the can a lot. my telecaster came out pretty good in no way does it look as good as the candy apple red paint job that was done by pat wilkins on my 89 speed monster neck through guitar but he would charge 100's of dollars to paint just a guitar body because it's more steps involved be that as it may I finished it. I used about 3/4 of the gold can and 3 and 1/2 of the clear. took about two weeks tricky part is when you go through and have to add more color you have to shake the can ALOT and pre spray on some paper otherwise you'll get a bit blotchy color i'm providing a picture of the body it's low light indoors you don't get the shine..

3.0

Well it is metallic looking...

By

Verified Buyer


I just tried the silver so far. I was hoping to be able to dispense with the bronzing type powders for a candy finish, but while this does look metallic, it does not recreate the effect of bronzing powders...

 
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