StewMac HeatStick for Neck Removal

StewMac HeatStick for Neck Removal

StewMac HeatStick for Neck Removal Short version for Solomon SL-30
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Short version for Solomon SL-30

Item # 0551
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$54.95

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StewMac HeatStick for Neck Removal Long version for Solomon SL-30
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Long version for Solomon SL-30

Item # 0553
In stock, ready to ship!

$59.95

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StewMac HeatStick for Neck Removal Short version for Weller WES51
New!

Short version for Weller WES51

Item # 0555
In stock, ready to ship!

$54.95

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StewMac HeatStick for Neck Removal Long version for Weller WES51
New!

Long version for Weller WES51

Item # 0556
In stock, ready to ship!

$59.95

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StewMac HeatStick for Neck Removal

About This Item

Remove glued necks with no damaging steam
The HeatStick™ uses the heat of your soldering iron to soften the glue in a guitar's neck joint for removing the neck.

The HeatStick replaces the old method of injecting steam into the joint, so delicate finishes are spared the damaging effects of hot steam. Use the HeatStick with our Neck Removal Jig or any other neck-removal system.

Thanks to repairman Ian Davlin for inventing this dry heat concept, and to repairman Gene Imbody for adapting it for soldering irons.

Neck joint trouble creates high action
Years of string tension take their toll on a guitar. The pressure distorts the body near the neck joint, changing the neck angle. String action becomes too high to play.

Lowering the bridge saddle compensates for this up to a point, but if the saddle can't be lowered any farther it's necessary to remove the neck and reglue it at a corrected angle (a "neck reset").

Don't add to the problem! The traditional way to release a glued neck joint is by piping steam from boiling water into the joint. That much water damages delicate finishes, and can loosen braces and neck blocks. That's why we've developed the HeatStick. The HeatStick works well with our Neck Removal Jig.

    Specifications
  • Heat tempered copper
  • Diameter: .125" (3.18mm)
  • Available to fit Solomon or Weller soldering irons
  • Includes 2 bits for drilling pilot and access holes

Long version: The long HeatStick is for acoustic guitar necks with heels that are over 2" tall.

Short version: The short HeatStick is for electric guitars, mandolins and other necks with heels less than 2" tall.

Depending on the type of glue and fit of the neck joint, we found that setting the soldering station on its highest setting yielded the best and fastest results.

Dimensions: Mounting connection for Solomon and Weller

Video

Instructions

Product Instructions

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5.0
  • 5.00 average rating from 4 reviews
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5.0

Really,,this is now THE way to remove necks

By


This is The way to take off a neck, period. This is one of those things that supersedes the old way to where someone still does it the old way and you say, 'why are you making it so hard'? We just did a 12th fret Martin and it was cake,,,no steam messing the finish. Do experiment with amounts of water injected into the hole with a pipette.

BTW cleanup is easy by putting the heatstick in a drill and steel wool back to clean!

5.0

Tough tenon pull on ES 175

By


My first time using it was on this 175. This is a tough removal. A tight mortise and tenon means you don't really get and air relief hole which is why this heater works so well. As you can see even though my exploratory holes hit right on the tenon seam I never felt it. I settled for where I thought would be a dovetail seam and heat up the joint with a little water pipetted in. With the neck removal jig I slowly worked it off and it took about an hour. Why this worked so well without steam is because I could slowly radiate heat throughout the entire mortise/tenon area. The toll was taken on my old Weller 51 which got very hot, came apart and will need to be replaced. You can rest assured most of your neck pulls won't be this tough

5.0

No fuss, no muss! Easy cleanup!

By

Verified Buyer


Received the copper rod and soldering rig today. In anticipation of its arrival, I prepped an HD28 for neck extraction (separated the FB extension and drilled an access hole) and mounted my Stew Mac neck extractor on the guitar. The tools arrived and I set them up according to the instructions (took about 5 minutes) and heated the rod. I gave it about ten minutes to reach operating temperature and inserted it into the access hole. After 4 minutes I squirted a pipette's worth of water down the hole and reinserted the tool. The water started hissing so I put a little pressure on the extraction screw and manipulated the body side-to-side (the neck was clamped as shown in the video, except unlike in the video my vise is bolted securely to a heavy maple workbench that doesn't move a jot. Makes all the difference). 3 minutes later the neck was out. No drama. From insertion to extraction was 8 minutes tops. The neck came out cleanly and the pocket was equally clean, with the normal amount of glue residue present. I'm impressed. A couple of observations: the tool diameter is .122". The supplied access hole drill bit is .144". Next time I'll drill a smaller. hole. As for scorching, the tool left a scorch mark on the dovetail. I was able to scrape most of it away. I may experiment with a lower temperature next time, but since any scorching is hidden I don't see it as an issue. Overall, this setup has real advantages over my steam setup. The main advantage is, of course, the absence of all the moisture in the neck joint. The pipette's worth was 80% gone when the neck came out. Some of it came out of the access hole as steam. Another advantage is that the process is dead quiet! You can hear the water hiss but that's about it. Lastly, there's no cleanup to speak of. So I'm pretty satisfied. I'm anxious to give a hide glue neck joint a try. If it proves difficult I'll update my post with that info. 

5.0

No steam. No Stress.

By

Verified Buyer


Dylan went electric, right? I was skeptical too, but it worked. Really well.

Popped two necks off guitars that, with the usual risk of having to touch up finish blushing or lifting plates, I wouldn't normally consider for a reset—one a vintage Parlor with paper-thin finish and a delicate purfling, the other a more modern Martin with M&T neck (which come off easily, but always require a touch of heat). Drill an access hole, fit the tip to your iron, and set it to heat. No risk to the finish or plates at the neck block.

I've found a few drops of water into the access hole from a pipette, and some patience, helps transfer the heat into the neck joint. Be prepared to wait a little longer than you might for a steam injector, somewhere about 15 minutes heating for each of these.

Next for some dovetail Martins.