Neck Relief Gauge

Neck Relief Gauge

Neck Relief Gauge

Item # 2004
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$114.85

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Neck Relief Gauge

About This Item

Takes the guesswork out of guitar truss rod adjustment, for more consistent and accurate playability.

Adjust a truss rod without guesswork!
Our Neck Relief Gauge helps you quickly and precisely adjust guitar fretboard straightness (for comfortable playability without fret buzz). It accurately measures the amount of variation from a dead flat position, to take the guesswork out of adding or subtracting neck relief as you adjust the truss rod.

Playability you can measure. You'll see the relief measurement on the dial as you adjust the truss rod, so it's easy to keep the neck playing its best. It's a great way to establish optimum standards for individual instruments, string gauges and playing styles.

Dependable and accurate. Designed by Don MacRostie here in our R&D shop, the Neck Relief Gauge is made of machined aluminum for stability. It has an easy to read dial indicator that's super accurate to .001". The feet of the gauge rest directly on the frets, so the measurement won't be compromised by a worn fingerboard. It's 12" (304.8mm) long, and can be positioned to take a relief measurement at either the 5th or 6th fret on a guitar fingerboard.

Instructions are included.

The Neck Relief Gauge is included in this money-saving set:
Nut Slotting Gauge and Neck Relief Gauge Set

Instructions

Product Instructions

Neck Relief Gauge Instructions

The Neck Relief Gauge is a quick and easy way to measure a guitar's neck relief/curvature when adjusting the truss rod.

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4.0
  • 4.24 average rating from 29 reviews
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5.0

Easy to use, good addition for set up.

By

Verified Buyer


Just bought this and although a bit pricey, it is worth it in terms of giving accurate neck relief measurements. I used it for a bass by adding a secondary straightedge so that it will span a longer length for a 34" scale. The key is to zero out the indicator on a known flat surface so that the bearing points of the straightedge give you good reference points to measure the bow in the neck. I usually set relief pretty shallow and nearly straight on guitars and a bit more on a bass. StewMac gives some general measurements in another publication for their string set up gauge but it would help if they repeated it in the instructions for this gauge.

4.0

Good idea but a little feedback

By


I love the tool, great concept and easy to use if you read the instructions. What I'd change is the "feet." Where you set it on its ends to zero out and on the frets... I'd make the stock a little wider so its sits more stably on the flat and on the frets so it doesn't fall over. Gives you back a hand to make tweaks.

5.0

Happiest guitarist

By

Verified Buyer


I bought all the items from StewMac that my husband had on his wishlist
for Christmas! I know he will be so happy when he unwraps his gift!
He really appreciates the quality of items he orders from your company.

5.0

Great For Guitars - Not for Basses or Mandolins

By

Verified Buyer


Read and understand the directions. With a little practice you'll be able to set neck relief to your comfort level. I'm hoping Stew-Mac will come out with an neck relief gauge for Basses and Mandolins, or at least come out with a gauge like this where you can slide the micrometer along the straight edge to a desired fret location.

5.0

This and a string height rule are all you really need!

By

Verified Buyer


I own dozens of guitars, and to set them all up exactly the same. All I do is use the neck relief gauge to set the neck to .007 of an inch, set the string height to 2mm, and then intonate. All my guitars then have the exact same feel with zero buzz. Forget about filing down frets to get rid of buzz or getting a guitar Plek'd. Think about how a guitar fretboard is made. It starts out as a flat piece of wood that has fret slots cut into it by a jig to the exact same depth. The frets start out as one long piece of fret wire that is cut down into the individual frets... in other words all the frets are exactly the same height because they started out as one long fret. Why would anybody remove fret metal by filing to artificially create relief ? It makes zero sense. Guitar necks aren't supposed to be dead flat. They are supposed to have relief so the string can always clear the frets inside of where your finger is fretting a note. Get a neck relief gauge and be done with it. If you do decide to remove fret metal by filing, you are stuck when the weather changes and your neck warps. You will always be fighting to find that one spot where all your frets line up because you filed and mutilated your frets. Conversely, I can always find the sweet spot in seconds with my neck relief gauge because I didn't remove any fret metal. (And if you use stainless steel frets to begin with, you will have zero fret wear and be golden forever.)

5.0

If you adjust your truss rod...... this is the tool!

By

Verified Buyer


I wish I has purchased this years ago. Takes guess work out of the equation and you get consistent results!

5.0

What A Relief!

By

Verified Buyer


One word describes this tool, INDISPENSABLE! Takes all the guess work out of setting the proper neck relief and is spot-on accurate. Did I mention easy to use? I am very happy with the tool and with the results.

5.0

Brilliant tool

By

Verified Buyer


Just received my Neck Relief Gauge in the mail this afternoon. Used it on my Gibson L6-S already. It sure takes the guesswork out of adjusting the neck relief and makes it a much quicker task, (not to mention far more accurate and repeatable). Will be adjusting all my other guitars with this little baby now. The trick of rocking the gauge to find the actual value is a great tip. Finding a truly flat surface to zero it on quickly shows you how things that may look flat actually are not. A straight edge is the best option there. Anyone who is serious about properly maintaining their instruments should have one of these (and the String Action Gauge).

3.0

Good Tool But Needs Better Instruction

By

Verified Buyer


The Neck Relief Gauge is a useful tool for helping adjust relief on guitar necks. But it desperately needs some usage instruction. The pamphlet that comes with the tool is insufficient. It doesn't tell you what the "normal" range is. So how are we supposed to know how to adjust the guitar?

In my opinion, this is one of those things where Stew Mac would be doing their customers a world of good by creating a short little video and uploading it to YouTube.

5.0

Wish I hadn't waited so long!

By

Verified Buyer


Sure simplifies things. But there is a little thing that you have to be careful of when using. It's hard to find the spot where you have the tool exactly perpendicular to the arched frets - and it matters. Even the tiniest tilt one way or the other will change the needle measurement drastically. But no problem. Simply go ahead and rock it side to side and use the reading where the needle stops and goes back the other way. This is actually more advisable than trusting what you 'think' is a perpendicular reading. You will probably be wrong. Don't worry if this isn't making sense. You will understand completely when you use it the first time. Stewmac might want to consider including this in the instructions if they can figure out a way to word it better than I did.

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StewMac PDF Catalog, page 18 See Neck Relief Gauge
on page 18 of our StewMac Digital Catalog