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Locking Roller Bridge

4.5
  • 53 Reviews
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Locking Roller Bridge Chrome

Chrome

Item # 5276
In stock, ready to ship!

$31.45

3 or more $27.99
+
Locking Roller Bridge Gold

Gold

Item # 5276-G
Due 5-7 days
Email when in stock

$35.65

3 or more $31.73
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Locking Roller Bridge

About This Item

Low-friction grooved saddles roll freely with a tremolo so your strings always return to pitch. Adjustable for precise intonation.

String
spread
Saddle
radius
Post
spacing
Post
threads
2"14"2-29/32"M8 x 1.25

This unique post-mounted brass bridge has low-friction grooved roller saddles for smooth string return, plus advanced features for improved intonation stability. The holes for the bridge posts are elongated to allow overall intonation adjustment, and allen screws lock the bridge to the posts. The reversible roller saddles are individually adjustable for precise string intonation, and also lock to the bridge with allen screws. Allen wrench and thumbwheel mounting posts with bushings are included.

Use an 11mm drill bit to install the bushings.

SAVE when you buy a roller bridge paired with a Bigsby Vibrato Tailpiece:
With Bigsby B50: Locking Roller Bridge with Bigsby B50 Vibrato
With Bigsby B70: Locking Roller Bridge with Bigsby B70 Vibrato

About bridge & tailpiece measurements

Bridge and Tailpiece reference image

String spread is the distance between the centers of the outer strings on a bridge or tailpiece.

Saddle radius determines the arc formed by all the individual saddle heights, and is similar to the measurement of a fretboard.

Stud/post spacing is the distance between the centers of the mounting posts of a bridge or 'stop' tailpiece.

Positioning the bridge
Find bridge placement for any scale with our free online tool fret position calculator.


    • Item #
    • Weight
    • 5276
    • 0.2396 lbs. (0.11 kg)
    • 5276-G
    • 0.2396 lbs. (0.11 kg)

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4.5
  • 4.68 average rating from 53 reviews
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5.0

The best pair with bigsbys and similar

By

Verified Buyer


This is a must when using Bigsby or like tremolos to keep strings moving free and stay in tune..don't forget the nut should be perfectly string gauge cut and lubricated as well.

5.0

Exact Replacement for Taylor T3 or T3B Bridge

By

Verified Buyer


To add a detail not mentioned in the previous reviews, this is the same bridge that Taylor installs on their hollow body electric T3, both with and without the Bigsby. The measurements matched, and once I had the bridge in hand it was an exact fit for my T3B. I recommend this bridge if your roller saddles have stopped rolling.

5.0

Problem solver

By

Verified Buyer


A Gretch Electromatic Pro Jet with factory Bigsby. The Bigsby is mounted too close to the stock tune-a-matic style bridge which causes the wound strings to contact and hangup on the tune-a-matic frame on their way down to the Bigsby roller. I first considered using a Vibra-Mate to shim the Bigsby up off the body, however.....
The Locking Roller Bridge is the same string spacing and radius for this guitar and the bridge frame allows all the strings freeplay between the rolling saddles to the Bigsby. I was able to keep the original studs/posts after some filing to expand the post holes on the new bridge.
Thanks Stew-Mac.

5.0

Used on a 2014 Epiphone ES-355

By

Verified Buyer


My Epi 355 came with a ABR style bridge that rattled like hell - a real piece of crap. I replaced the ABR with this roller bridge, and the guitar now sounds fabulous. It sounds very solid, with great tone, and absolutely no rattles. Things to know: the bushings supplied with the roller bridge are a lot larger than the stock bushings. I chose to leave the stock bushings and posts on the guitar. The roller bridge will fit right over the stock posts - it is the same width as the Epi bridge, within 1/32". The Roller Bridge has two set-screws on each side, that tighten agains the posts to "lock" the bridge. You also use these set screws to position the bridge, front to back, relative to the posts, so there is a lot of adjustability. If you choose to use the stock threaded posts, as I did, there is a possibility that you will damage the screw threads of the posts by tightening the the bridge's set-screws against the post's threads. But this isn't a big issue - what you do is screw in the threaded posts (lower them) so that the tops of the posts are even with the top of the Roller Bridge. That way, if you do damage the threads, it'll only be the upper part of the threads. And if, someday, you go back to the original bridge, the damaged threads would be well above the area used by the original bridge's threaded thumbwheel, and the damaged area would be hidden in the body of the ABR. As I said before, even using the stock threaded posts, the bridge is solid and the guitar sounds great. Now, to the lack of intonation adjustment screws: this is the first bridge I've had without forward/back adjustment screws, and yes, it takes more time to do intonation...you have to manually push the bridge piece forward and back, then lock it down to the bridge body by tightening its screw...but it wasn't that hard. The payoff is that the bridge is utterly vibration free. And I don't know about you, but for me, once I set the intonation on a given guitar with a given set of strings, I rarely have to redo it.

5.0

Better that AB-R 1, and Nashville, type bridges.

By

Verified Buyer


I find that a few guitars have greater neck angle than designed. Gibson is not immune to this.
Most guitars set up within the limits of the design perameters. This bridge has better clearance
from the saddles to the back of the bridge. And this allows better height adjustment at the stop.
Also the roller saddles are very easy on the B, & E, strings. If the saddles on the tunematics,
are filed incorrectly, they will eat your strings. Especially the cheap zinc allow type. CHECK the
POST SPACING ! If the post spacing greater that 2mm wider or narrower, it won't fit. You can
machine it slightly to fit. But thats the limit. This bridge is machined pretty close. Also it has
set screws to lock the posts ! I love that. This bridge has great tuning stability. I have used this bridge on quite a few guitars with excellent results. I have used this bridge on Jaguars &
Jazzmasters, with those old Fender rocking bridges with great results. Posts have to be reset.
They look allot better. And function perfectly with the tremolo.
JW

3.0

Locking Roller Bridge, Chrome

By

Verified Buyer


The screws and the inserts are really bad: there is too much spaces (soory for my english: i am french).
But the bridge is OK.

5.0

Goodbye broken strings!

By

Verified Buyer


I bought this looking to reduce string breakage. I don't have a Bigsby on my Les Paul but I do a lot of heavy string bending as part of my solos and it eats up strings. Typically I've been lucky to make it through a two hour show without breaking a string. I've made sure that the saddles on my stock tune o matic were deburred and I tried graphtech string saver saddles, which helped some but I didn't like the resulting change to the tone. I also top wrap the tailpiece to reduce the angle where the strings meet the bridge. It's usually been the high E that breaks right where it meets the saddle on the pickup side. Until I got this roller bridge, nothing has worked to reduce the string breakage. I just made it through three 3 and 4 hour shows without breaking a string. I'm going to say my problem is solved! I've never had a set of strings last that long on my Les Paul ever.

3.0

Gold finish does not last

By

Verified Buyer


I have used several of these bridges on my guitars, with generally good results. Last year, I tried one finished in gold. Functionally, it is equal to the others, but the finish is rubbing off wherever my hand makes contact with less than 6 months of playing...I'm going to have to replace the bridge if I intend to sell this guitar.

5.0

Bar bridge replacement.

By

Verified Buyer


I was experiencing some string noise on my Gretsch NC 1959 reissue of Chet's guitar. The bar bridge that came on it wasn't machined quite right on the 3rd string. It wasn't seated right and allowed the string to vibrate and make a harmonic noise. (think I was the only one who noticed it). I replaced it with this new roller bridge and in addition of fixing my problem it was easier to get the intonation on each string right on the money. Thanks.

5.0

Epiphone the best replacement

By

Verified Buyer


Do you not get confused this is the perfect replacement for the Epiphone Les Paul the post are the perfect size do you not look at the other one like the Nashville version

Showing 10 of 53 Read more reviews >>


StewMac PDF Catalog, page 66 See Locking Roller Bridge
on page 66 of our StewMac Digital Catalog