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Golden Age Roller Bridge

4.5
  • 101 Reviews
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Golden Age Roller Bridge Chrome

Chrome

Item # 1275
In stock, ready to ship!

$36.70

3 or more $32.66
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Golden Age Roller Bridge Gold

Gold

Item # 1275-G
In stock, ready to ship!

$41.95

3 or more $37.34
+
 
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Golden Age Roller Bridge

About This Item

The only roller bridge that matches the 12" radius of the Nashville Tune-O-Matic. Low-friction brass roller saddles let the strings move freely and return to accurate pitch.

We designed this bridge to work with Bigsby vibratos, in place of the Nashville Tune-o-matic. This is the only roller bridge that matches the 12" radius of the Nashville, so you maintain the string action you're used to. We gave it a low profile to keep the strings clear of the bridge body too, eliminating a frequent source of vibrato problems.

Thumbwheel height-adjustment studs and knurled bushings are included.

String spread   Saddle radius   Stud spacing   Stud threads   
2-1/16"12"2-29/32"M5 x .8

About bridge & tailpiece measurements

Bridge and Tailpiece reference image

String spread is the distance between the centers of the outer strings on a bridge or tailpiece.

Saddle radius determines the arc formed by all the individual saddle heights, and is similar to the measurement of a fretboard.

Stud/post spacing is the distance between the centers of the mounting posts of a bridge or 'stop' tailpiece.


    • Item #
    • Weight
    • 1275
    • 0.1700 lbs. (0.08 kg)
    • 1275-G
    • 0.1700 lbs. (0.08 kg)

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4.5
  • 4.63 average rating from 101 reviews
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5.0

works perfectly

By

Verified Buyer


ordered with a bigsby whammy bar and zero fret nut to go on an old gibson sg that was having tuning issues. all fitted perfectly as advertised and was playable again in a couple of hours. easy to get a great action and sounds very impressive. This will be a very used and abused instrument played by a professional muso at gigs most nights,and fully expect all will hold out for a good long time. SPECIAL THANKS to stew mac for replacing the first golden age roller bridge which had some manufacturing flaws. one email and the replacement was on its way ,arriving 3 days later, no mean feat considering we are in west australia, as far from stew mac as it gets. have been a very satisfied customer here for a long time. great company and staff.

5.0

Les Paul Roller Bridge

By

Verified Buyer


Bought this bridge as part of my Studio Les Paul make over. So far I am very impressed and this will only be getting better as I add in the bone nut and locking tuners.

5.0

Quality part.

By

Verified Buyer


Bought it for my Gibson Chet Atkins Country Gentleman. The guitar definitely stays in tune much better.

5.0

Golden Age Roller Bridge

By

Verified Buyer


I just bought a 2017 Gibson Studio Les Paul, I went on You Tube to check out the guitar for a demo, the guy giving the demo said he put a Stewmac Golden Age Roller Bridge on his and it stayed in tune . The price was right and i ordered one, everyone was real helpful and knew the product. took it to Guitar Center and bridge fit perfect and no new drilling had to be done. Guitar stays in tune and if you have a Les Paul i would get one.

4.0

Pretty good fit for my Wildkat

By

Verified Buyer


Bought this for my Epiphone Wildkat. Pretty good fit. Reasonable price, quick delivery. Works, but takes some modification. There are three ways to make this fit.

First, when you remove stock bridge and unscrew the stock posts, you'll have two threaded holes into the body of your guitar. The stock posts are 8 mm, while the replacements are 5 mm. However, the replacements have a kind of knuckled bushing you can tap down into the threaded holes, then you just set the new bridge on top. I decided against this option 'cos I just don't like the idea of jacking up the stock threads. Just me.

I thought I'd rather keep the stock posts, especially 'cos they're more substantial, and that's good in bridge material, right? So I bought a new 1/4" drill and, using the existing holes in the new bridge as guides, drilled out the holes. The new bridge hole don't go all the way through, but to make it work on the stock posts, I drilled clean through. Careful how you put this in your vice, you don't wanna mash the rollers. Once I did this, the new bridge just dropped snugly onto the stock posts and I was in business. Probly the most difficult part was filing the edges of the holes clean and removing the small drill burrs. I recommend buying a new drill. By the time I was done with the second hole through this hard metal, it had dulled and it was hard going. Well worth the five bucks.

The third method I read about but didn't try, was just unscrewing the rollers from the new bridge and swapping out the pieces in the stock bridge. Seemed pretty simple.

I've used it at a couple practices and a three-hour gig. Worked very well. Once in practice I plucked the strings in a kind of double stop thing, and the high E string came off the roller inward. Happened twice that practice, but not at the gig. I'll have to keep my eye on that.

3.0

Golden Age roller Bridge - OK but not perfect

By

Verified Buyer


Overall, good value for the money - however, on balance wish I'd gone for the Schaller roller bridge. The fact that there is some adjustment on the string widths with the Schaller an advantage - you can then adjust so that all strings right over poles. The measurement on the Golden Age a few millimetres out on my fit - particularly on the low E & A (and they were perfect with the original tune-a -matic) so perhaps that could be adjusted by manufacturer?

2.0

UPDATE: REMOVAL

By

Verified Buyer


AFTER putting 'Golden-Age' Roller Blades on two of my Gibson's, I am forced to remove them. The problem is that the string tension is not tight enough with these bridge's on the guitars and the strings feel 'MUSHY'. On my Les Paul, I had to get the Relief down to .004" @ 7TH Fret to get the tension anywhere near acceptable, and it really wasn't and if affected the tone of the guitar.When I set the relief it was done with a Notched Straightedge standing in playing position set to .004" @ 7TH & .0055" @ 9TH Fret. To check it, I Capo'd the 1ST Fret and Fretted the 15TH Fret and checked the 7TH Fret to see if there was a .004" 'Relief/space and that was the point at which I could no longer see/detect a space and the Guitars neck still was pretty lifeless and the sound was just NOT good enough AND, from what I know about working on Gibson's guitars(and hearing it from a GIBSON MEMPHIS Final Inspector), the 'RELIEF' at the 7TH Fret when checked as just mentioned should correspond to the 'Relief' measurement of the Notched-Straight-Edge method, and with the 'Golden-Age' Roller-Bridge, IT DID NOT.(It was close,it had to be, were are talking thousandths of an inch here)

So, after changing back to the original Tune-O-Matic that was on the Guitar when purchased, NEW in October 2016, I set the relief @ .004" @ 7TH Fret, just as I did with the Golden-Age Roller-Bridge and the Guitar was back to the way it was when I bought it.The 'Relief' setting of .004" @ 7TH Fret w/Notched Straight-Edge is the same when checking it with the Capo on the 1ST Fret and Fretting the 15TH Fret. AND the guitar Just has a Cleaner Crisper sound and better string tension on the strings...and,of course I have had to Jack up the Stop-Tail on the Low 'E'.

As far as the 2016 SG Special that I put a Bigsby Bigsby B3 on.Originally, I opted for the 'Golden-Age' Roller-Bridge so as to stop the guitar going out of tune on the slightest of bends with the Bigsby. Also, so I could stop jacking up the Stop-Tail to avoid the strings hitting the back of the bridge-plate (like on the just mentioned Les Paul),which was accomplished with the Roller-Bridge. To be fair,I was able to crank the Stop-Tail all the way down on both guitars using the Roller-Bridge without the strings hitting the bridge-Plate back and it does hold tune on the SG Special a little better than the Tune-O-Matic original. However, the lack of string tension is a very noticable, ('LIFELESS'-ness in the tension on the strings), so I am debating whether or not to take the Roller-Bridge off of the SG Special as well and am leaning more towards taking it off than not. When I first changed to the Roller-Bridge on the SG Special Bigsby I noticed the tension/sound difference IMMEDIATELY, and thought MAYBE I had set it up wrong, BUT NO, I DID NOT. After trying to adjust the tension bar and string action (Higher/Lower) and everything else I could think of I was at square one with not enough tension and 'MUSHY' strings w/relief @ .006" which is the lowest I ever have to go, relief wise, with any of my other SG's, Bigsby or not.

I have worked on guitars for a long time and have wondered why GIBSON doesn't fix the little issue's like strings hitting the back of the Bridge-plate and the minor tuning stability issues with the 'G' string and after working on dozens of them and trying everything that has come down the pike to try to fix those things and the fixes not being as good as the way GIBSON has been selling them for decades, my take is this: Gibson has left it alone because it is as good as it gets the way it is and can not be improved upon.Leaving a GIBSON stock is the way to go and if it is not to one's liking, get a different brand guitar. For me,I'm sticking with GIBSON, the Beauty-of-the-Beast is the Beast I love best. AND I do not have the kind of CA$H to buy the $5,000-$10,000 Japanese axe's that Phil Campbell plays anyway, so there it is......

5.0

ES 135 Back in Action

By


I've had this 1999 Gibson ES-135 since it was new, that's a lot of years ago, and have never been able to keep it in tune. I love the guitar, the way the maple neck feels, it's easy to pop harmonics wherever you want. It has the trapeze bridge that makes it easier to bend strings than my 335 with the stop tailpiece. But it wouldn't stay in tune. I just sprung for a Golden Age Roller Bridge and new Grover locking tuners. What a difference. It has been a minor miracle. I can bend notes up two full steps and back and it's still in tune. Gibson should be ashamed for selling new equipment with such poorly machined parts. The Golden Age Roller Bridge fit right on. I left the studs in the body of the guitar, and screwed in the two new posts, set the bridge on it. With very little time spent, the guitar was solid as a rock, intonation was simple. Bend some strings up high, and then throw down an open chord, beautiful!

5.0

Guild Starfire v1

By


Bought new guild starfire v1 and was disappointed that this beauty would not stay in tune..The dreaded g string sounded terrible,i decided to try heavier strings 11s which did not help..My next move was to have the guitar set up.once I got the guitar home it was much better but still not good enough to gig with..i really started to dig and figured spend more money.Once I put the golden age roller on it really made a huge difference.Now I can use my vibrato and keeps in tune..it worked for me..hope this helps??

5.0

Golden Age on my Gretsch Jet

By

Verified Buyer


The roller bridge was a perfect fit on my modified 2008 125th anniversary Pro Jet. The neck scale required a readjustment of the individual saddles. But that was it. I am very pleased with the quality of the bridge. My Bigsby works much smoother and with more accuracy and less re-tuning. All thumbs up in my world.

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StewMac PDF Catalog, page 66 See Golden Age Roller Bridge
on page 66 of our StewMac Digital Catalog